Wednesday, January 29, 2020

How much has Frontier's network changed?

This week, I decided to take a step back from hardcore revenue analytics like we have seen in the past few weeks. While revenue is one of the most important metrics in determining the health of a market, I thought I’d switch to an operational and schedule analysis this week. So this week we’ll take a look at the Department of Transportations on-time performance report. I’d argue this dataset provides some of the most insightful views to the operation of an airline, but is wildly underutilized.

Why? If you are not one of those data nerds that often pull raw datasets yourself, you likely assume that the OTP information basically tells you if a flight arrives on-time or not and that is about it. But in today's post, we will use OTP information to see aircraft routing, aircraft metrics, fleet used for service, etc. There is plenty of other metrics that could also be estimated from the dataset including operational spares and turn times.

While these might not sound as sexy metrics, consider this. If you can examine an airlines' aircraft utilization to a few hundredths of a point and have a good future fleet source, then you can have confidence when estimating how much capacity a target airline may have left by fleet to deploy at any given point of the schedule.

Today, we will combine both the Frontier schedule and on-time performance information to see exactly what has changed within the Frontier network over time and what has stayed the same.

First, let's take a look at aircraft utilization. As you might expect, ULCCs push their assets longer to spread fixed costs across more ASMs. However, if you expected Frontier to be firewalling their fleet compared to previous years, you are going to be surprised.



When we look at the Frontier operated schedule from the DOT's OTP report, we can see Frontier's April schedule has been pretty consistent in their fleet deployment since 2007. There is a noticeable decline in Frontier's utilization in 2011, however, it should be noted during 2011, Republic was handling a significant share of Frontier's flying. Republic was removed from today’s data.



But what about other ULCC carriers? How does Frontier stack vs Spirit or Allegiant if they have not increased their utilization? Frontier and Spirit are largely identical in their deployments. Allegiant, interestingly, has a hard cutoff around 13 hours which you do not see at Spirit or Frontier.



If you are an inflight crew, you likely know this is only a piece of an aircraft's daily story. While I do not currently have turn time (time on the gate). Turn time and total aircraft operating can be decoded from the OTP data, however, I have not built the model for it at this time. In time. I promise. Maybe.

In addition to core aircraft utilization metrics, we can also track tail number specific movements within airline networks. Here's Grizz (N227FR) on 4/19 - 4/22.


By the way, if you are an old hardcore Frontier fan, you will be disappointed to know Flip and Larry have been retired. They were A319s living in an A321 world.

But beyond tracking our favorite fictitious Frontier tail, we can glean useful information from tracking tail numbers. Based on Frontier’s OTP data, starting in 2014, it appears we can see two distinct base schedules per year, at least in terms of aircraft routings. Really, these appear to be highs and lows for aircraft routing thru Denver. There appears to be a distinct Denver high (April thru November) and a Denver low (December thru March).

While it might seem like a general, "oh that's pretty cool", there are real-world implications here. Aircraft have to be maintained and crews need to be based. I’d be interested in learning if crews are moved to non-DEN bases during this time or if non-DEN crews are pushed harder during higher non-DEN routing periods. The chart also shows that Frontier is no longer directly dependent upon Denver to route their aircraft.

Additionally with this data, we can begin to see how many aircraft frames Frontier is deploying within their operation over any set period of time. This is different from frames within the fleet since a percentage of frames will be down for scheduled maintenance among other events.


Finally, while we often see on the forums jokes regarding Frontier's "dartboard" approach to capacity planning, what we find is what appears to be a 40%, 20%, 20% strategy. 40% mature routes, 20% maturing routes, and 20% yearling routes.

When we look on an absolute basis, most planners will see Frontier's declining absolute maturity within their routes. In other words, Frontier has cut deeply into their maturing frequencies that have existed for 3+ years for yearling frequencies (< 1-year-old) or maturing frequencies (2-3-year-old routes).


But the chart is somewhat misleading. The drop in mature frequencies is more a function of Frontier's shift towards more breadth and lower frequency within its existing network.


Absolute route counts have skyrocketed since 2016 as Frontier has diversified its network. During the peak travel demand period, Frontier operated nearly 350 routes, albeit at very low frequency. 


In relative terms, Frontier has invested 40% of its routes towards mature capacity (> 3 years old), 20% towards maturing routes (2-3 years old), and 20% towards yearling routes. This appears to flex some, but it appears to be a good rule of thumb. 


Finally, as we all have come to know Frontier over the last few years the airline has become known as the king of churn. We have all seen the press releases where Frontier has started one billion new markets across a million new cities. They are often announcing so many new cities and routes, they have to deploy their general council to announce route on their behalf. (Rant: If you have to use your general council for route announcements, you are either too thinly staffed or announcing far too many routes).

What we often do not hear is Frontier's "seasonal" service that never seems to return


Frontier will be interesting to watch over the next few years. With the amount of new frames coming from Airbus, I do wonder if the churn rate is sustainable. Finding new homes for airframes gets increasingly more difficult when the amount of frames continue to increase

In the near term, it sure feels like we are days or weeks away from another massive expansion from being announced, just in time for summer 2020 travel. 


1 comment:

  1. This is my airline! I work here and its amazing to see how frontier has changed in the last couple years. I loved that part about the routing through Denver. We have really diversified our bases and Orlando is now as big as Denver in terms of crew. This is awesome to see. Thank you.

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